Spam Alert: Phishing Email Scam Titled ‘Bank of America Alert: Account Suspended’

We recently discovered a new phishing scam from a Bank of America spam email message that attempts to warn a computer user of an 'invalid login' resulting in a 'suspended banking account'. The spam message is ultimately a phishing scam that tries to lure computer users to a phishing site to obtain banking account login credentials.

In the ancient 'how-to-scam computer users with a bank phishing email' book, hackers have literally worn out the ink in continually using the same scam tactics. Why do they keep doing this? Easy, they do it because it is still very effect and ultimately works to their benefit. Cybercrooks who are armed with an online banking account holder's login credentials can literally clean-out someones bank account. Could you imagine waking up tomorrow morning and logging into your bank account to find out your previous $5,000 balance is now at zero?

The phishing email that we received, shown in Figure 1 below, looks legitimate and can come-off as very convincing to unsuspecting computer users who may hold a valid Bank of America account. The email reads:

Dear Valued Member,

We noticed invalid login attempts into you account online from an unknown IP address .
Due to this, we have temporarily suspended your account.
We need you to update your account information for your online banking to be re-activated
please update your billing information today by clicking

here www.bankofamerica.com/account/re-activation/ After a few clicks,

just verify the information you entered is correct.
Sincerely,

BOA Member Services Team
P.S. The link in this message will be expire within 24 Hours . You have to update your payment information

© 2010 BOA LLC. All Rights Reserved.

bank-of-america-phishing-email-message-scam
Figure 1. - Phishing/Fake Bank of America email message

Phishing is an act of a cybercrook impersonating a trusted entity. In the email that we received, the perpetrator is impersonating being a Bank of America 'service team member'. Just about every phishing email has some type of link or attachment. In the case of the Bank of America phishing message that we received, it includes a link to a known phishing site (hxxp://www.share724.com), shown in Figure 2, that was recently taken down. From our extensive experience with such scams, we suspect that the phishing site, when it was live, asked users for their Bank of America online account login and password in addition to other identifiable information.

suspected-phishing-site-boa-scam-link
Figure 2. - Link (hxxp://www.share724.com) from Bank of America Phishing email redirects to a web page that is suspected to be part of a phishing site.

Spam and phishing scam emails are running rampant through the Internet accounting for billions of messages sent every day. Even though some reports that indicate a sudden decline in global spam email volumes, each and every computer user should know how to identify potentially harmful emails. It is essential that you never relinquish personal information to anyone including a website that may 'appear' to be legitimate.

Have you ever seen an email similar to the Bank of America phishing message show in Figure 1 above? If so, did you mistakenly click on a link in the message? What happened after that?

7 Comments

  • melissa:

    I received one saying my card was suspended due to needing to update my payment info. I don’t have a bank of america credit card.

  • Annemiek den Hollander:

    Some emails are obviously phishing scam, but sometimes it is almost impossible to distinguish a phishing email scam from the real thing.

  • Mike:

    I received the email about to many lock out attempts. Be careful it was the first internet scam I almost fell for.

  • Todd:

    Yesterday I did a quick Google search to get the bank of America address. Went to the website filled in my login info and got the phony phishing screen with the phone number. Be aware this is a result of a search using Google. I would not have known I was at the wrong site. I’ve seen it all and this one got me. Be advised. Double check the web address. I’ve never seen this as a result of a search engine.

  • John Waugh:

    I got this same situation from a Bing search forr Bank of America login search.
    It brought up a link & after attemepting to login, I got the locked error message and a number to call for BOA tech support. An Indian man answered and I hung up. I got a call back from an Indian woman who said I was cut off from tech support. And was I having problems with my pc. I said no and hung up. I called BoA security and reported the toll free numbers and the website. Please not this was not as a result of an email. This site came up as a search in Bing for Bank of America.

  • Karen:

    I have just receive a different Bank of America scam email.

    Technical services of the Bank of America are carrying out a planned software upgrade.

    It goes on and want all of my information from name, address, and, drivers license, DOB.

    I know it is a scam because if the grammar and the fact that I do not have an account with Bank of America.

  • noe:

    J’ai surfé sur internet quelques heures ces derniers temps, et j’ai rarement trouvé un article aussi intéressant que le votre. C’est, de mon point de vue, très bien fait. À mon avis, si les propriétaires de sites Web et les blogueurs, faisaient du contenu aussi bon que celui que vous avez fait, Internet serait beaucoup plus intéressant que jamais.

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