FBI Moneypak Ransomware

FBI Moneypak Ransomware Description

FBI Moneypak Ransomware Image 1ESG security researchers have received reports of a ransomware infection, known as the FBI Moneypak ransomware, that targets computer users in the United States. The FBI Moneypak ransomware infection will claim that the victim's computer was involved in viewing child pornography and then demands payment of a 100 dollar 'fine' to be sent via MoneyPack. Of course, that a criminal charge as serious as child pornography would be punished with a mere 100 dollar fine is laughable. There is a reason for this, the FBI Moneypak ransomware is not really from the FBI. Rather, this message is actually part of a common malware scam.

The FBI Moneypak ransomware scam will use a Winlocker, that is, a malware infection that locks down Windows, preventing the user from connecting to the infected computer. The FBI Moneypak ransomware message will claim that the FBI has blocked your computer because of the supposed criminal activities mentioned above and threatens to prosecute and block your access to your computer permanently unless you send them money through MoneyPack. It goes on to say that you only have 72 hours to pay before they initiate legal proceedings that could lead to huge fines and possible jail time.

This intrusive message blocks the whole screen and resembles an Internet Explorer window. The FBI Moneypak ransomware message is caused by a Trojan infection that also blocks access to the Windows Task Manager, Command Prompt, Desktop and other components that could potentially help you bypass this intrusive message. Fortunately, the FBI Moneypak ransomware scam is not particularly sophisticated or complicated to remove and, of course, FBI Moneypak ransomware has no relationship with the actual FBI (so you can relax about supposedly being in trouble with the law). The FBI Moneypak ransomware scam is a simple variant of a very common malware scam known as the Ukash Virus. The Ukash Virus mainly targets European computer systems. If you replace 'FBI' with European law enforcement agencies and 'MoneyPack' with Ukash or PaySafeCard, it is the same basic scam.

Dealing with the FBI Moneypak Ransomware Scam


The FBI Moneypak ransomware is not difficult to remove. In fact, manual removal is simply a matter of removing its associated Windows Registry Entry and associated files. The main problem is gaining access to your computer system in the first place. To do this, ESG security researchers recommend either starting Windows in Safe Mode or from an external memory device. From there, most reliable anti-malware programs should be able to remove the FBI Moneypak ransomware infection with ease.

Infected with FBI Moneypak Ransomware? Scan Your PC for Free

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Security Doesn't Let You Download SpyHunter or Access the Internet?


Solutions: Your computer may have malware hiding in memory that prevents any program, including SpyHunter, from executing on your computer. Follow to download SpyHunter and gain access to the Internet:
  • Use an alternative browser. Malware may disable your browser. If you're using IE, for example, and having problems downloading SpyHunter, you should open Firefox, Chrome or Safari browser instead.
  • Use a removable media. Download SpyHunter on another clean computer, burn it to a USB flash drive, DVD/CD, or any preferred removable media, then install it on your infected computer and run SpyHunter's malware scanner.
  • Start Windows in Safe Mode. If you can not access your Window's desktop, reboot your computer in 'Safe Mode with Networking' and install SpyHunter in Safe Mode.
  • IE Users: Disable proxy server for Internet Explorer to browse the web with Internet Explorer or update your anti-spyware program. Malware modifies your Windows settings to use a proxy server to prevent you from browsing the web with IE.

If you still can't install SpyHunter? View other possible causes of installation issues.

Technical Information

Infection Statistics


Our MalwareTracker shows malware activity across the world. Explore real-time data of FBI Moneypak Ransomware outbreaks and other threats from global to local level.

File System Details

FBI Moneypak Ransomware creates the following file(s):
# File Name Size MD5 Detection Count
1 %appdata%\Microsoft\Windows\Templates\style.jpg 350,795 30c8ac2e6e077f1a7f88e5807285e2ba 72
2 %appdata%\Microsoft\Windows\Templates\style.bmp 2,250,054 799eaf32967b1cec037546b5dc087510 53
3 %WINDIR%\Fonts\2HMwR.com 405,504 e6be886e4733b8dd55fe61465479a1aa 35
4 %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Windows\Templates\DircxtX.exe 166,912 c64e0edf655e7f5a71a15157d34c007d 3
5 %TEMP%\0_0u_l.exe N/A
6 %StartupFolder%\ch810.exe N/A
7 %APPDATA%\jork_0_typ_col.exe N/A
8 tpl_0_c.exe N/A
9 %WINDIR%\system32\0_0u_l.exe N/A
10 %Temp%\[RANDOM].exe N/A
11 %StartupFolder%\wpbt0.dll N/A
12 V.class N/A
13 WARNING.txt N/A
14 %StartupFolder%\ctfmon.lnk N/A

Registry Details

FBI Moneypak Ransomware creates the following registry entry or registry entries:
HKEY..\..\..\..{RegistryKeys}
cconf.txt.enc
%AppData%\vsdsrv32.exe

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3 Comments

  • Donny Dowes says:

    this FBI ransom thing is not allowing me to use IE for some sites. I think it has changed my IP settings. How do you change them back?

  • Tim Downey says:

    issue solved… the spyhunter detection scanner found several threats and trojans. after removing, my internet explorer no longer redirects to the fake fbi site. thanks guys. you rock.

  • Chris Parsons says:

    Not a funny story, but I was threatend by the IRS once and this FBI warning seriously had my blood presure up. Glad to know it is a fake.

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